Flat Foot Symptoms In Adults

posted on 23 Apr 2015 08:02 by longingintermis22
Overview
Adult flatfoot (adult acquired flatfoot) or posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD) is a common pathology presented to foot and ankle specialists. PTTD is characterized by a valgus (everted) hindfoot, flattening of the longitudinal arch of the foot (collapse) and abduction of the forefoot. This is a progressive deformity that begins flexible and can become rigid over time. The posterior tibial tendon (PT) is one of the main supporting structures of the foot arch. Changes within this tendon cause flattening of the foot. There are four stages of this deformity that begins flexible and progressives, with no treatment, to a rigid deformity and with time may involve the ankle joint. Patients usually present with pain in the foot or ankle stating the ?ankle? is rolling. It?s also common for patients to state they have difficulty walking barefoot. Pain is exacerbated after physical activities. Pain is usually isolated to the inside of the foot along the course of the PT tendon. Adult Acquired Flat Foot

Causes
Many health conditions can create a painful flatfoot, an injury to the ligaments in the foot can cause the joints to fall out of alignment. The ligaments support the bones and prevent them from moving. If the ligaments are torn, the foot will become flat and painful. This more commonly occurs in the middle of the foot (Lisfranc injury), but can also occur in the back of the foot. In addition to ligament injuries, fractures and dislocations of the bones in the midfoot can also lead to a flatfoot deformity.

Symptoms
Symptoms shift around a bit, depending on what stage of PTTD you?re in. For instance, you?re likely to start off with tendonitis, or inflammation of the posterior tibial tendon. This will make the area around the inside of your ankle and possibly into your arch swollen, reddened, warm to the touch, and painful. Inflammation may actually last throughout the stages of PTTD. The ankle will also begin to roll towards the inside of the foot (pronate), your heel may tilt, and you may experience some pain in your leg (e.g. shin splints). As the condition progresses, the toes and foot begin to turn outward, so that when you look at your foot from the back (or have a friend look for you, because-hey-that can be kind of a difficult maneuver to pull off) more toes than usual will be visible on the outside (i.e. the side with the pinky toe). At this stage, the foot?s still going to be flexible, although it will likely have flattened somewhat due to the lack of support from the posterior tibial tendon. You may also find it difficult to stand on your toes. Finally, you may reach a stage in which your feet are inflexibly flat. At this point, you may experience pain below your ankle on the outside of your foot, and you might even develop arthritis in the ankle.

Diagnosis
The adult acquired flatfoot, secondary to posterior tibial tendon dysfunction, is diagnosed in a number of ways with no single test proven to be totally reliable. The most accurate diagnosis is made by a skilled clinician utilizing observation and hands on evaluation of the foot and ankle. Observation of the foot in a walking examination is most reliable. The affected foot appears more pronated and deformed compared to the unaffected foot. Muscle testing will show a strength deficit. An easy test to perform in the office is the single foot raise. A patient is asked to step with full body weight on the symptomatic foot, keeping the unaffected foot off the ground. The patient is then instructed to "raise up on the tip toes" of the affected foot. If the posterior tibial tendon has been attenuated or ruptured, the patient will be unable to lift the heel off the floor and rise onto the toes. In less severe cases, the patient will be able to rise on the toes, but the heel will not be noted to invert as it normally does when we rise onto the toes. X-rays can be helpful but are not diagnostic of the adult acquired flatfoot. Both feet - the symptomatic and asymptomatic - will demonstrate a flatfoot deformity on x-ray. Careful observation may show a greater severity of deformity on the affected side.

Non surgical Treatment
Patients can be treated non-surgically with in-shoe devices and braces to hold their feet in the correct position. This can reduce pain and damage and assist with walking. Physical therapy is also given to improve muscle strength and help prevent injury to the foot. Surgery can be performed if the patient doesn?t find any relief. Flat Feet

Surgical Treatment
Surgical intervention for adult acquired flatfoot is appropriate when there is pain and swelling, and the patient notices that one foot looks different than the other because the arch is collapsing. As many as three in four adults with flat feet eventually need surgery, and it?s better to have the joint preservation procedure done before your arch totally collapses. In most cases, early and appropriate surgical treatment is successful in stabilizing the condition.
Tags: adult, aquired, flat, foot